Tuesday, March 10, 1970

Williams’ team ties for first in Moultrie ‘Pot-of-Gold’ play

Four Rome golfers opened the 1970 season with a bang while participating in the $7,500 “Pot-of-Gold” tournament this past weekend at Moultrie.

Raymond Williams’ team of Robert Baxter, Jerry Argo and Ab Harris fired a 14-under par 130 for the team of Chuck Brasington of Gainesville, Fla.

Williams’ team was a stroke off the pace at the halfway point with a nine-under 63.

Brasington’s team had identical rounds of seven-under 65.

Earl Fennell was the low pro with a one-under-par 143. Tied for second place at even par 144 were Fred McDuffie of the host Sunset Country Club and Emory Lee of Palmetto.

Wednesday, March 11, 1970

Bogus money found by Rome authorities

Rome detectives said small quantities of counterfeit bills, all in denominations of $20, have been discovered in at least two places in Rome and Floyd County.

Officials at the Frist National Bank uncovered the first bills Monday, all bearing serial number F32279516B. They bore face plate number L236.

Detectives described the money as being “old looking and not of good quality.”

Shortly after the bank officials found the first bills, detectives were notified of three more found last Thursday by a girl on Williamson Street. The girl told detectives she found them on a sidewalk near her home and added that she “watched the newspaper and listened to the radio” to see whether anyone had lost it. She said she called detectives after hearing on the radio that counterfeit money was circulating in the area.

The Secret Service was expected to enter the investigation today.

100 years ago as presented in the March 1920 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

The rumor which was current on the streets that Rome was almost in the grip of a coal famine was found to be untrue, at least for the next few days, or as Mr. R. . Graves, local coal dealer, stated, “unless something unforeseen occurs,” there will be no fear of coal giving out at all.

Mr. Graves said that the railroads were confiscating nearly all the coal, and at the mines would refuse to sign bills of lading. This, he said, had happened to his firm many times in the past few months but he had four cars on the road which would reach Rome soon he thought, and there would be plenty of cold then for all.

Monday, March 9, 1970

Too many years for cake candles

ATLANTA (UPI) – Layona Glenn received telegrams from President Nixon, Gov. Lester Maddox and Atlanta Mayor Sam Massell for her birthday Sunday. It was her 104th.

The cake was in the shape of an open book inscribed with the achievements of Miss Glenn’s life. It was close to two and a half feet long.

Apparently the through of 104 candles was too much for the party planners and Miss Glenn made her birthday wish while cutting a candleless cake.

She retired from missionary work in Brazil in 1934 and returned there in March of 1966 to celebrate her 100th birthday.

Friday, March 13, 1970

West Rome band plans concert

The annual winter concert of the West Rome High School Band will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at the school auditorium.

Among the selections to be played by the full concert band are “The Mad Major”; “America the Beautiful”; “Eroica Overture”; “Nobles of the Mystic Shrine” by Sousa; “The Great Gate of Kiev” by Moussorgsky and “Variations on a Korean Folk Song.”

Miss Patti Tolbert, a music major at Berry College, and a former student at West Rome, will direct “El Festivo.”

A small admissions charge will be made for the concert.

100 years ago as presented in the March 1920 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

Roy Dickerson, who is charged with aiding in the robbery of a bank at Girard, Alabama, and arrested in Los Angeles recently, escaped from jail in Los Angeles using a crude key to the cell of the city prison and climbing up a ventilator shaft,

His wife, who also is in jail in Los Angeles, said this was his 118th escape. She said he formerly was a vaudeville performer and an adept and removing handcuffs and other things of a restrictive nature put on him.

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The first actual work on the paving of the Summerville Pike, which work is expected to begin in earnest on April 1, has been done when the gravel and rock, to be used in the construction of the highway, is being hauled and dumped along the road.

This road is one of the state highway system, and the start of the work will be heralded with great interest by the citizens of the county. It means a better means of communication with the citizens in the northern part of the county, and its construction will mean much to the merchants of Rome.

The work on the Rome Lindale highway has also started and soon the county is to have two roads as good as any others found anywhere in the state of Georgia. Other road work is to start soon also.

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The rumor which was current on the streets that Rome was almost in the grip of a coal famine was found to be untrue, at least for the next few days, or as Mr. R. . Graves, local coal dealer, stated, “unless something unforeseen occurs,” there will be no fear of coal giving out at all.

Mr. Graves said that the railroads were confiscating nearly all the coal, and at the mines would refuse to sign bills of lading. This, he said, had happened to his firm many times in the past few months but he had four cars on the road which would reach Rome soon he thought, and there would be plenty of cold then for all.

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B.A. Richards, of the Richards Battery Company, is offering a purebred pedigreed Holstein bull to the member of the boys’ corn club in Floyd County who raises the greatest number of bushels of corn to the area this year. The offer is made in connection with the work of the boys’ corn club under W.E. Bowers, the county agent.

A recent resident of the county, Mr. Richards is very enthusiastic over his prospects and makes this offer to encourage both corn growing and stock raising.

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