Gibson Priest

Gibson Priest

Shot hole is a disease that shows up under our current weather conditions.

Shot hole is a disease that leaves circular holes in leaves that eventually join and make larger holes. This gives the appearance of shooting a shotgun at the shrub and causing multiple holes, thus the name shot hole.

Shot hole is a disease caused by the combination of bacterial infection and fungal diseases. This disease does well in our hot, humid, summer days. The peak of time for this disease is May through September. This disease can be found on laurels (bay and otto luyken), camellia, ligustrum, hydrangea and ivy.

Leaves infected by shot hole can continue to be ‘eaten’ away by the disease, leaving a ragged appearance. As leaves are damaged, they begin to fall away. The plant loses its ability to make food and can become stressed.

How to deal with shot hole? Sanitation is the best way to keep the disease from coming back. Clean up contaminated leaves from under the plant.

When diseased leaves build-up under the plant, rain or watering can splash the disease back up on the plant. Spray the leaves with a fungicide such as Mancozeb at the first sign of a problem. Read and follow the label directions for how to use it. When using pesticides, observe all directions, restrictions and precautions on the label.

If you have any questions regarding shot hole or other gardening problems, you are welcome to contact the extension office at 770-749-2142 or email uge2233@uga.edu.

For more information and details on upcoming events, check out the Polk County Extension office on Facebook by searching “UGA Extension Polk County.”

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