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U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene gets committee assignments

14th Congressional District Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Republican who lives in Rome, Ga., represents the 14th Congressional District, which is comprised of a 11 counties in Northwest Georgia, including Walker, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cobb (a portion of the county), Dade, Floyd, Gordon, Murray, Paulding, Polk, and Whitfield.

Northwest Georgia’s Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene received committee assignments Tuesday, Jan. 17, after a ban during her first two years as the 14th District representative.

Greene won plum assignments on both the House Committee on Oversight and Accountability and the House Committee on Homeland Security, for the 118th Congress.

In a statement released Tuesday evening, Jan. 17, she said oversight is one of the key agenda items for the Republican majority.

“We will return the role of the Oversight Committee to investigating waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement of the federal government, which is exactly what the American people are fed up with,” she said.

Both President Joe Biden and “every three- and four-letter agency” will have to answer to the oversight committee, she said, adding that the House Homeland Security Committee also plans to investigate administration failures.

“Our Southern border is being invaded by millions of illegal aliens, criminals, and potential terrorists. Our people are being murdered by Chinese fentanyl flooding in from the cartels. Our Border Patrol and ICE agents have their hands tied and have been turned into a welcoming committee by the Biden administration. Cyber attacks continue on our nation’s people and businesses along with many more threats to our homeland,” Greene said.

The assignments were approved by the House Steering Committee but still have to be ratified next week by the full GOP conference before the committees can meet.

14th Congressional District Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Republican who lives in Rome, Ga., represents the 14th Congressional District, which is comprised of a 11 counties in Northwest Georgia, including Walker, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cobb (a portion of the county), Dade, Floyd, Gordon, Murray, Paulding, Polk, and Whitfield.


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A makeover for Fort Oglethorpe

More Information To see all 134 pages of pictures and plans in RSVP, visit https://fortogov.com/rsvp-4 or drop by City Hall and pick up a print copy.

Fort Oglethorpe could be on the verge of a major makeover. It won’t happen overnight, City Manager Molly Huhn says, but the first steps have been taken and regular progress is being made.

With the help of the University of Georgia Carl Vinson Institute of Government, the Lyndhurst Foundation and others, the city has developed a 134-page concept plan for its historic district.

The RSVP, or Renaissance Strategic Vision and Plan, tackles the historic district practically street by street with some pretty sleek and classy ideas.

But before going there, let’s start with the city’s new logo, which stands as an inspiration for everything to come. It’s simple, modern, historic and adaptable.

Designed largely by the Carl Vinson Institute, the logo features a giant O at its center. “Fort,” in a just-enough fancy font, sits above and a little inside the O and “Est. 1949” balances the top to the right. Underneath is the full name of the city and state.

That’s the official city logo. To adapt it for the historic district, a horse is jumping through the O, in commemoration of the military fort days when polo was a popular sport on Barnhardt Circle.

The logo has also been adapted in vertical and horizontal designs and for the various city departments. It looks cool on signs, trucks, mugs, T-shirts, hats, and fits nicely just about anywhere else, and will be showing up in different colors.

Simple changes

Many of the changes proposed for the historic district are simple but remarkable in their effect: paint, trees, facade-type changes.

The old library on Barnhardt Circle goes from looking stark and utilitarian to blended and modern with just a paint job.

The city plans to turn it into a Recreation and Leisure Services headquarters.

Simple or not

RSVP includes two ideas regarding the Performance Learning Center on Barnhardt Circle, one simple and one dramatic.

It could be painted to match the old library, giving it a sleeker look.

Or, should the Department of Education be interested in finding a new location for the school, it could be torn down and a stately new city hall built there, instead.

Dramatic changes

Ideas are included in RSVP for refurbishing ugly old warehouses with huge glass windows and turning them into restaurants with outdoor dining. The idea of a brewery is shown. There are ideas for improving and expanding the Stable 41 Farmers Market that already exists.

Most dramatic of all is a picture of Lafayette Road lined with tress and sporting three-story buildings that could house both businesses and apartments.

Some of RSVP includes things the city envisions bringing to life, but much of it will take private vision and investment, with the city possibly providing incentives. And taxpayers will surely have a say, too.

To see all 134 pages of pictures and plans in RSVP, visit https://fortogov.com/rsvp-4 or drop by City Hall and pick up a print copy.


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Georgia Affordable Care Act enrollment soars

ATLANTA — A record number of Georgians — over 846,000 — signed up for health insurance for 2023 under the Affordable Care Act during the latest open enrollment period, which ended on Sunday, Jan. 15.

That’s about 8% of the state’s population, and at least 145,000 more than signed up for the program last year.

The program allows individuals — many of them low-income or self-employed — to sign up for private health insurance. It offers significant tax subsidies to offset insurance costs for people earning between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty level, or between $13,590 and $54,360 for an individual.

The program has steadily grown in popularity in Georgia. Only about 316,000 Georgians signed up in 2014, its first year.

In Georgia, 10 insurers offered plans for 2023, including big players such as Aetna, Anthem and Ambetter as well as upstarts like Oscar and Friday. However, not all of the plans are available in every county.

While open enrollment has closed for this year, Georgians can still sign up for Healthcare.Gov plans under certain circumstances, such as the loss of health care coverage, marriage or divorce, the birth or adoption of a child, or a major change in income.

One reason the program has soared in popularity in Georgia is that the Inflation Reduction Act a then-Democratic Congress passed last year increased the dollar amount of subsidies for people purchasing the health-care plans.

About 80% of Affordable Care Act enrollees nationwide qualify for subsidies that reduce their monthly payments to less than $10, according to the federal Department of Health and Human Services.

“My last person I (helped) only paid $8 a month health-care coverage for 2023,” Deanna Williams, an insurance navigator who works at Georgians for a Healthy Future, said during a press conference last week. “A lot of people who I’ve helped, especially in my rural area … were shocked to know that they could get a plan.”

Despite its increasing popularity, the Affordable Care Act is not without controversy in Georgia.

Earlier this year, the federal government denied the state’s application to exit the HealthCare.Gov marketplace, a key part of Republican Gov. Brian Kemp’s health-care agenda.

The state then established its own health-insurance portal, GeorgiaAccess.Gov, directing consumers to private insurers.

Democrats contend the state should expand Medicaid to help cover more uninsured Georgians. On Friday, Jan. 13, state House Minority Leader James Beverly, D-Macon, and other House Democrats introduced a bill that would allow the state to expand Medicaid.

But Medicaid expansion is unlikely to gain the Republican backing necessary to pass in the General Assembly.

However, the state does plan to expand Medicaid on a limited basis by providing the insurance to low-income Georgians who meet monthly work, education or volunteer requirements. The state initially estimated that plan, slated to start in July, would help around 64,000 Georgians obtain health insurance.


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