'Blue Bayou' filming continues around Rome

A camera car heads down South Broad Street behind a lead car, passing Etowah Terrace, as traffic is temporarily halted around 5:30 p.m. Sunday for “Blue Bayou” filming.

After temperatures in the 90s plus for what seemed like forever, we’ve got a break in the heat — enjoy it!

This is the best time to get out and hike at Berry College, or the trails at Jackson Hill or Garrard Park (aka GE) before it turns into Georgia’s version of cold weather.

Weather on the last day of the Coosa Valley Fair was spectacular after several days of oppressive heat, and this weekend we’ve got Fiddlin’ Fest downtown Saturday.

Several blocks of Broad Street will be cordoned off for the event. There will be two live music stages — one on the Cotton Block and the other near the new lofts. There will also be pony rides and arts and craft vendors.

And the best part is that admission is free.

On the off chance you’re game for more, just after Fiddlin’ Fest at the Vogue is a truly fall-inspired festival — Oktoberfest. The festival celebrates Bavarian culture and flowing pints of beer. There will be traditional food as well as music — including Floyd County’s own Timothy Reynolds. Tickets are available online or at Harvest Moon downtown.

There’s a lot of bickering, but here’s the real point

Vote.

The signs have sprouted everywhere, just in case you hadn’t noticed that it’s election season as well.

If you’re looking to beat the lines, early voting for city commissioner begins on Oct. 14 and runs through Nov. 1.

Five candidates are seeking the three Ward 1 seats: Jim Bojo, Mark Cochran and incumbents Bill Irmscher, Milton Slack and Sundai Stevenson. The Ward 3 race, where Commissioner Evie McNiece is not seeking reelection, has four candidates: J.J. Walker Seifert, Bonny Askew and incumbents Bill Collins and Craig McDaniel.

We’ve got a good batch of candidates and despite what we failed to correct on a recent column, Election Day is still on Nov. 5.

Taking the focus outward, national politics remain as crazy as ever.

We’re seeing President Trump attempting to flaunt, then downplay, his dealings with foreign countries. We’ve long viewed foreign interference in our elections as a threat to U.S. sovereignty, and while it appears to be just short of a solicitation for help in an election, which is illegal, it strengthens other accusations — Ukraine and Russia for instance.

Most Republican leaders have been largely silent or supportive of his call for foreign governments to investigate political rivals, and that’s unfortunate. There was a time when our political parties were self-policing. But as their focus turns more toward keeping political power, or gaining in the case of the Democrats, rather than representing their constituents — we’ll likely see even less of it.

The long and short of it is this, our elections must remain a stable, trusted and transparent process. Once we lose that, it’s a slippery slope to a much worse place for our country.

A little excitement around filming

Rome’s racking up its list of movies filmed in and around the area. At one point it seemed we only had Harrison Ford’s lovely description of our town from “The Mosquito Coast” then several other films popped in — “Sweet Home Alabama” and “Remember the Titans” to name a couple.

There seems to be more traffic from big-budget filmmakers in and around this area and this weekend was no exception.

A few roadblocks and specially put-together film production vehicles caused quite a stir at the filming of “Blue Bayou” downtown this past weekend.

Film crews were around town — from Second Avenue to Broad Street to Myrtle Hill Cemetery over the weekend. Lanyards on crew members bore the words “Blue Bayou,” the working title for the new Marvel Studios Black Widow movie starring Scarlett Johansson, according to IMDb. The film, according to the same website, is scheduled for release in 2020.

There are also rumors of other productions in the area as well. We haven’t gotten any type of confirmation — official or otherwise — but even without it, the idea is kind of fun.

It’s great to see our community recognized as a good setting for a variety of different films, and we can’t forget our local filmmakers as well, who are just as talented and work just as hard producing independent films.

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