Chick-fil-A VP to sign new book in Cave Spring today at The Peddler - Rome News-Tribune: Local

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Chick-fil-A VP to sign new book in Cave Spring today at The Peddler

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Posted: Saturday, November 7, 2015 9:00 am

Dee Ann Turner, Chick-fil-A vice president for corporate talent, will be signing copies of her new book “It’s My Pleasure” today in Cave Spring.

The event will be held at The Peddler, 22 Alabama St., from noon to 3 p.m.

Turner said she believes the phrase, ‘It’s my pleasure’, was a part of the culture at the Ritz Carlton Hotel chain.

Chick-fil-A founder Truett Cathy was always trying to take away service ideas from top-tier hospitality organizations to make his restaurants a little different.

“When he heard that phrase he liked it so much better than how a teenager team member might typically respond which is ‘no problem’ so he decided ‘It’s my pleasure’ sounded so much nicer,” Turner said.

She said Cathy repeated that phrase annually at seminars and told his franchisees that they should have their team members respond to a thank you with “It’s my pleasure,” or “My pleasure.”

Turner said the book came out Tuesday but had to go to a second printing before it was even published to meet the pre-orders.

Turner said she has been shocked, surprised and humbled by the early success of the book, which has been No. 1 on seven different categories through Amazon.

The Peddler owners Rip Montgomery and Curtis Burch, have been friends to her family for many years and have done some decorating work for her.

When they invited her to do a book signing it offered a great opportunity for her to meet a lot of Chick-fil-A fans.

“After the passing of Truett Cathy in September of 2014, and having worked for him for nearly 30 years at that time, I knew how important people principles were to Truett. I wanted to be sure we never forgot it,” Turner said.

She said that even in the last year of his life, the Chick-fil-A founder kept reminding her that people decisions were always the most important that the company would make.

“I felt a responsibility that none of us forget how important that was and what a competitive advantage it has been for Chick-fil-A,” Turner said. “I wanted the people who came after Truett left us to know what the basis of our culture was and the foundation of what he created.”