Floyd Medical Center provides human hearts for RMS healthcare studies

Healthcare science students at Rome Middle School were able to get an up-close look at heart disease and the effects different problems have on a real human heart.

Healthcare science students at Rome Middle School were able to get an up-close look at heart disease and the effects different problems have on a real human heart.

Lauren Fallin, a second-year healthcare science teacher who has moved from Rome High School to take the reins for the middle school pathway, worked with representatives from Floyd Medical Center’s Cardiac Stepdown Unit to offer the children a look at eight preserved human hearts. Only one of them was considered healthy.

The students saw how different conditions can damage the most important muscle in the human body. They were also allowed to touch the hearts and ask questions.

Registered Nurses Misty Shinall and Keely Harris both treat patients with heart-related illnesses at Floyd. They were able to give Rome Middle School students information from a real-world perspective and provide valuable knowledge about the circulatory system.

The hearts were provided by Southeastern Pathology. The five damaged hearts were affected by different diseases the class is studying.

The healthy heart was about the size of a human fist. The others were visibly altered by systolic heart failure, a valve replacement, fatty deposits and other issues. The nurses pointed out the irregularities as the students held the hearts and examined them.

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