Monday, April 7, 1969

Work continues on plans for Floyd Junior College

Work on construction of Floyd Junior College will begin in June, with actual construction of buildings expected to start in July.

Presently Architect Richard Aeck of Atlanta is working on detailed plans for the new school to be located six miles south of Rome on U.S. Highway 27. Classes are expected to open in the fall of 1970.

Grading of the site will begin in June, according to J.D. Maddox, who served as chairman of the junior college committee which sought successfully to have the school located in Floyd County. Test holes are being drilled at the site now. Initial construction will consist of five buildings – an administration-library, classrooms-laboratories, a physical education facility, a maintenance building and a student center.

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia will handle all construction with Floyd County providing $3.2 million for initial work. All future construction and salaries of all staff members will be financed by the Board of Regents.

Floyd County voters approved the establishment of the college in a referendum in November 1968 after a five-year struggle by proponents of the school.

Maddox said that the Board of Regents is expected to select a president of the college in the fall. He said he knew of no prospective names for the position.

After initial construction, additions are expected to be made to the classroom facility, the library, the physical education facility, which will at first consist of an exercise room, a gymnasium and indoor swimming pool.

100 years ago as presented in the April 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

Prohibition is causing an astonishing increase in illicit distilling in the Appalachian mountain territory, according to statements made by a number of Appalachian mountain workers, at the final session of their conference in Knoxville, Tenn. The difficulty of dealing with the situation was discussed, during which it was asserted that persons from towns and cities, offer the moonshiners $18 to $25 a gallon for their green illicit whiskey.

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According to the Southern Textile Bulletin, P.M. Sinclair, has been promoted from overseer of spinning at the Aragon Georgia Mills to superintendent, and J.W. Jay, who has been overseer of weaving at that mill has accepted the position of superintendent of the Brookford Mills, at Brookford, N.C. … Renzo West who had been overseas and returned to Lindale several weeks ago, after being discharged, will leave tomorrow for Dunn, N.C., where he will live with his mother until the return from overseas of another brother. … Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Hayes, who have been visiting relatives here for several weeks, will go to Trion to live, where Mr. Hayes has taken employment with the mills.

Tuesday, April 8, 1969

Ray petitions for new trial

MEMPHIS (AP) – James Earl Ray, contending that two of his lawyers were more interested in financial gains than his fate, has officially asked for a new trial in the slaying of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In a petition filed Monday, Ray said he was “pressured” into a March 10 guilty plea because a trial would have made the facts a “matter of public record for the free use of all” and would have endangered the success of a projected book and movie.

Ray was represented first by Arthur Hanes of Birmingham, an attorney he fired in November, and then by Percy Foreman of Houston, who arranged a 99-year sentence in exchange for the guilty plea.

The motion said Foreman “pressured him, and he, the defendant, under duress due to this pressure, entered a plea of ‘guilty’” for “the sole financial gain of the said attorney.”

Attached to the petition were letters and agreements involving Ray, author William Bradford Hule of Harstselle, Ala., who is writing a book about Ray and negotiating movie, rights, Hanes and Foreman.

No date has been set for hearing on the motion. The attorney general’s office has said that Ray would be returned from his maximum security cell in the penitentiary in Nashville to Memphis for any such hearings.

The motion was filed by three men listed as attorneys for Ray – Richard J. Ryan of Memphis, J.B. Stoner of Savannah, Ga., and Robert W. Hill Jr. of Chattanooga.

Wednesday, April 9, 1969

Gammon picked for District Key Club award

Buddy Gammon, president of the East Rome Key Club, has been honored by being named the most outstanding lieutenant governor in the Georgia District of Key Club International.

Gammon serves as lieutenant governor of the 11th division of the Georgia district.

The division includes clubs in Cedartown, Dalton, Calhoun and Rockmart as well as Rome. There are 17 other divisions in the state.

Gammon was presented a plaque citing his outstanding achievement by the Rome Kiwanis Club which sponsors Key Clubs in East Rome, West Rome and Model high schools. Key Club is a school service organization sponsored by Kiwanis.

Gammon was selected for the honor by the board of trustees of the Georgia District of Kiwanis.

Friday, April 11, 1969

Variety is spice of sports slate

The weekend sports picture, although currently plagued by wet conditions, should prove to be interesting to most fans who prefer variety.

For instance, baseball will no doubt catch the spotlight on most fronts with key games on tap for area high school teams as well as Berry College.

The troops of Coach Larry Taylor will step out of the preseason scramble and move into GIAC play Saturday when Georgia Southwestern comes in for a single game.

A total of five baseball games are on tap for Saturday including two college tilts. The Berry-Georgia Southwestern game and Shorter is scheduled to meet Georgia College at Legion Field.

While Berry has been winning at a rapid pace this season (17-3 record), the Shorter Hawks, just returning to the baseball wars, have chalked up a single victory in their only outing.

Both teams have games scheduled for today as Berry plays host to William Jewell, defending NAIA champions, in a single game with a 3 p.m. starting time. Shorter will play Georgia Southwestern in a non-counting GIAC battle at Legion Field.

In today’s high school action, West Rome travels to Cartersville for a Region 7-AA South battle, while Adairsville invaded Model. Cedartown moves to East Rome and Cass goes to Pepperell. The Cedartown- East Rome and Cass-Pepperell tilts are both Region 7-A battles.

On Saturday, the high schoolers will have Coosa at Adairsville, while CMA invades Darlington for a pair of Mid-South games.

Most action scheduled for Thursday was rained out and a number the games will have to be rescheduled since they are sub-region outings. However, East Rome may not play Dalton and Coosa could drop the game with Cedartown. The Rockmart-Model game has been set for May 5, while Cave Spring and Red Bud must get together in a Region 7-C battle.

While baseball is holding the spotlight in the immediate area, track teams will journey north to participate in the LaFayette Invitational Re

100 years ago as presented in the April 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

The management of The Strand, formerly The Alhambra, has been fortunate in securing the Vierra Hawaiian singers and players, a troop of five musicians, for an engagement here this month. This company will offer their play titled “A Night in Honolulu.” The Hawaiian music is interpreted throughout the entire program, which lasts for two hours. It is of special interest to know that the Hawaiian singers in the cast are of royal blood and some a few years back were sent to this country to be educated in our schools and the colleges. They studied their different professions, which were picked out for each individual. After finishing their courses they were sent back to the islands where they taught their brothers and sisters the knowledge of their learning in this country. This company has been intact for five years.

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The stockholders of the Eagle Stove Works, Rome’s new stove foundry, met at the Rome chamber of commerce and a very enthusiastic and harmonious session.

Since more than $50,000 of the capital stock had been subscribed, the minimum capital of the company was fixed at $50,000, with a privilege of increasing to $100,000, and an opening capital of $60,000 was authorized.

It is proposed to use the site of the scale works in the Sixth Ward for this plant.

The company numbers among its stockholders 210 of Rome’s progressive citizens and bids fair to help make Rome the stove center of the South.

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Prohibition is causing an astonishing increase in illicit distilling in the Appalachian mountain territory, according to statements made by a number of Appalachian mountain workers, at the final session of their conference in Knoxville, Tenn. The difficulty of dealing with the situation was discussed, during which it was asserted that persons from towns and cities, offer the moonshiners $18 to $25 a gallon for their green illicit whiskey.

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According to the Southern Textile Bulletin, P.M. Sinclair, has been promoted from overseer of spinning at the Aragon Georgia Mills to superintendent, and J.W. Jay, who has been overseer of weaving at that mill has accepted the position of superintendent of the Brookford Mills, at Brookford, N.C. … Renzo West who had been overseas and returned to Lindale several weeks ago, after being discharged, will leave tomorrow for Dunn, N.C., where he will live with his mother until the return from overseas of another brother. … Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Hayes, who have been visiting relatives here for several weeks, will go to Trion to live, where Mr. Hayes has taken employment with the mills.