RN-T

As presented in the February 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

A Roman, Commander John H. Towers of the United States Navy, has been placed in charge of the project of a trans-Atlantic flight in airships. This is a matter that is receiving much attention by both American and British governments. Private parties are also planning for the same and William T. Campbell, another Roman, and former lieutenant in the Army Aviation Service has plans well-developed for a flight across the ocean under the auspices of an airplane manufacturing concern. Lt. Campbell was one of the Army’s most daring aviators while in the service.

There is much rivalry as to who shall be first to attempt this ambitious feat - but it is safe to say that a room and will have a hand in it whenever it is accomplished.

***

The old Bricks’ home on Third Avenue, which for more than half a century adorned at the crest of Shorter Hill, is being torn away and in a few weeks a handsome modern bungalow will be built in its place. Mr. T.B. Owens, who recently purchased the place, will reside in the new home with his family. With a passing of this picturesque old landmark many pleasant reminisces of antebellum times are revised in the memories of old citizens. With its numerous terraces, the site is one of the handsomest in Rome.

***

Dresses which many women now are wearing are causing them to become “knock-kneed, knock-armed and sway-backed,” recently declared Mrs. J. Milton Mensendick in an address before the 20th Century Club in Philadelphia, Penn.

Dr. William A. Stencher, director of physical education in the Philadelphia public schools, agrees with Mrs. Mensendick that dresses which make women answer to that description are in style, but he asserts that there is no danger that they will become permanently disabled by their efforts to conform to the new fashions.

“There is nothing the matter with a woman’s frame of body, but there is with her frame of mind,” he said. “In other words, she is not knock-kneed, etc, because she can’t help it but rather because she wants to be in fashion.”

“Dr. Celia Mosher, of Leland Stanford University, says all of a woman’s muscles can be developed to be as strong as those of a man,” said Dr. Stencher. “Women are men’s muscular inferiors 10 to 33 percent, statistics say. This is due to no innate disability, but to women’s traditional ideas regarding modest feminine exercise.

“On the other hand, men are women’s inferiors when it comes to feeling the cold. Everybody knows how long a woman can remain in bathing, and how scant her clothing maybe in winter, and yet she does not die of exposure.”

***

A Roman, Commander John H. Towers of the United States Navy, has been placed in charge of the project of a trans-Atlantic flight in airships. This is a matter that is receiving much attention by both American and British governments. Private parties are also planning for the same and William T. Campbell, another Roman, and former lieutenant in the Army Aviation Service has plans well-developed for a flight across the ocean under the auspices of an airplane manufacturing concern. Lt. Campbell was one of the Army’s most daring aviators while in the service.

There is much rivalry as to who shall be first to attempt this ambitious feat - but it is safe to say that a room and will have a hand in it whenever it is accomplished.

***

Within the next two weeks the Kentucky Refractorium Company, formerly the ACME Fire Brick Company, in West Rome, will be open for the first time in a year, with a core of workmen numbering approximately 35.

Mr B.E. Welsh, who came here about a year ago as superintendent under J.H. Hammond, owner and general manager who died several months ago, recently purchased the plant from the heirs of Mr. Hammond at a price of $10,700, and intends to remodel and enlarge the plant, he says.

This company is one of several industries which has opened here since the war ended and is a sign of returning prosperity.

***

The old Bricks’ home on Third Avenue, which for more than half a century adorned at the crest of Shorter Hill, is being torn away and in a few weeks a handsome modern bungalow will be built in its place. Mr. T.B. Owens, who recently purchased the place, will reside in the new home with his family. With a passing of this picturesque old landmark many pleasant reminisces of antebellum times are revised in the memories of old citizens. With its numerous terraces, the site is one of the handsomest in Rome.