Tuesday, May 6, 1969

A big 16th birthday! Charlotte makes solo

With a new piece of chewing gum in hand, Charlotte Kennedy apparently felt that she could conquer the world as she made her solo flight at Russell Field last weekend.

Following completion of her solo jaunt, Charlotte, a sophomore at Coosa High School, received her solo wings from flight instructor CWO John Garrard of the Civil Air Patrol.

It’s not unusual for people to make solo flights, but the C-TSgt of the Rome Squadron of Civil Air Patrol performed the feat on her 16th birthday. She began her instructions in April and piloted the Cessna 172 aircraft without a flaw. In making the flight, she became the youngest pilot in Georgia.

Charlotte has a natural interest in the Civil Air Patrol, her father, Capt. Earl Kennedy, is commander of the Rome Squadron.

Under a new program in CAP Cadet Training, qualified cadets pay one-third of the cost for training, the Squadron pays a third and the CAP Corporation pays the remaining amount of the cost to attain a student pilot’s certificate.

Cadet Kennedy was selected as an outstanding cadet in the regular program and was chosen to participate in the new flight training.

Since her family are mambrers in the Rome CAP Aero Club, Inc., Cadet Kennedy was named a bona fide member in the Aero Club and took her flight instructions in the club aircraft.

Future qualified cadets, who may be selected for the training program, can take their flight instruction from a qualified approved flight school they select.

Just minutes before takeoff, cadet Kennedy wanted only “a new piece of chewing gum” and she would be ready to fly. Instructor Garrard had no doubt about her passing all qualifications in making the flight.

She only had to wait until her 16th birthday – Saturday – to complete the final phase of seeking her wings.

She has been a member of the Rome Squadron of Civil Air Patrol for three years.

As presented in the May 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

An automobile containing several persons residing near the Berry School on the Summerville Road came near being wrecked when the steering gear of the car breaking caused it to swerve into a field from the road — badly shaking up the occupants, who were several ladies and gentlemen. Charlie Mendelson, a local taxi cab driver, came along after the accident, and assisted the driver of the wrecked auto in getting his car back on the road. With the exception of the broken steering gear, the car was uninjured.

Superintendent W.A. Marshall, of the Lindale Cotton Mills, returned from attending a business trip to New York and Boston. … W.C. Long, who has been with the Massachusetts Cotton Mills office for more than a year, severed his connection there and will move with his family back to Cedartown. … Arthur Mathis, loom fixer, is contemplating taking employment at the Aragon Cotton Mills.

Monday, May 5, 1969

Marietta ceremonies honor first trans-Atlantic trip

MARIETTA, Ga. – Ceremonies were held today at Dobbins Naval Air Station to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the world’s first trans-Atlantic flight.

In May 1919, the Navy’s NC-4 flying boat made the historic flight 3,000 miles from Rockaway, N.Y., to Plymouth, England, and the crew returned to the U.S. for a whirlwind tour or cities.

During the ceremonies, a lithograph picture of the NC-4 was presented to Bruce Hamler, Rome City manager, in memory of Admiral John Henry Towers, a native of Rome who commanded the air squadron which made the flight 50 years ago.

The presentation was made by Capts. George Watkins and Thomas A. Williamson Jr., USNR. The two officers are embarking on a similar flight this year in a T-28C. The commemorative flight, which originated in the nation’s capital, is an abridged version of the NC-4 1919-1920 recruiting tour of 35 cities throughout the U.S. On this year’s tour, some 12 cities were to be visited from April 30 to Tuesday.

Other representatives from Rome included William Towers, nephew of Admiral Towers; David Harvey, Rome City commissioner, and Alton Nixon, chief of the Rome Fire Department.

Wednesday, May 7, 1969

Armuchee Indians claim 5-B North track crown

With freshman Dale Payton claiming three first places, the Armuchee Indians captured the team championship and qualified a flock of thinclads in the Region 5-B North track and field championships Tuesday at LaFayette.

Payton won the 10-yard dash, broad jump and triple jump as Coach Charlie Weatherford’s Indians scored a team total of 56 points to beat out Gordon Lee for the team title. The Trojans had 44 points, followed in order by Chattanooga Valley 35, Dade County 23, Trion 14, Valley Point 4 and West Side 4.

The first three finishers in each event qualified for the 5-B finals scheduled Friday at Rome’s Barron Stadium. This event starts at 6:30 p.m.

Armuchee won six events, finished second in four others and third on four occasions to rack up its points.

Other winners for the Indians were Kenneth Storey in the 440-yard dash, Herman Hawkins in the shot put and Charles Burk in the low hurdles.

Armuchee’s 440-yard relay team was in a good position to win but had the misfortune of dropping its baton. As a result, the Indians failed to qualify in the event.

In the only other prep track action Tuesday, Calhoun overcame a deficit in the final events to beat West Rome and Cedartown in a triangular meet at Barron Stadium.

The Yellow Jackets tallied 76 points with West Rome a close second with 71 points. Trailing was Cedartown with only 26 points.

Calhoun virtually swept the 220-yard dash and two-mile run to take charge in the event, and the Jackets sewed up by winning the mile relay – final running even of the afternoon.

The Chiefs, by virtue of its strong showing in the field events, took and early lead, but were just unable to hold it.

Calhoun’s only double winner was Larry Mashburn, who won the 880 and mile runs. The Smith boys, Xavier and Charles, picked up five firsts between them for West Rome, Xavier winning the high hump, high hurdles and low hurdles.

100 years ago as presented in the May 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

Superintendent W.A. Marshall, of the Lindale Cotton Mills, returned from attending a business trip to New York and Boston. … W.C. Long, who has been with the Massachusetts Cotton Mills office for more than a year, severed his connection there and will move with his family back to Cedartown. … Arthur Mathis, loom fixer, is contemplating taking employment at the Aragon Cotton Mills.

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Japan is considered, because of its delightful climate, the playground of the East. Residents of other countries of the Far East Indies, the Philippines and the Straits settlements, take flight to Japan in the hot summer months to enjoy its mountain resorts. Owing to the large tourist business some of these resorts present all the up-to-date advantages.

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The Rome fire department tested an improved hose coupling, just perfected and manufactured by the Davis Foundry and Machine Works of the city, and the local firemen say it has proven to be the best and simplest hose coupling they have ever seen.

A pressure of 250 pounds was applied to the hose line equipped with a new couplings, and although it took six men to hold the nozzle steady, so enormous was the pressure, the coupling not only held perfectly, but never leaked a drop.

The particular advantage the Rome-made coupling has over the ones generally used is that it snaps together with a lever latch, instead of the old style way of making a screw connection. The new way, not only saves much time, but is “positive” and its grip and leak proof.

Fire Chief Sharpe says that he hopes to obtain authority from the city commissioners to install this coupling on the local equipment, as replacements are necessary, and at the same time show Rome’s absolute faith in its own products.