Monday, April 28, 1969

Henderson Room is dedicated at Sunday event

Ceremonies were conducted Sunday dedicating the Georgia Room at Carnegie Library as the Henderson Room in memory of Mrs. J.L. Henderson, former librarian at Carnegie and Shorter College.

Mrs. E.V. McSwiney, chairman of the library’s board of directors, made the formal dedication and displayed a memorial plaque to be placed at the entrance to the Georgia collection.

Mrs. Bryan Jolly paid tribute to Mrs. Henderson and delivered another from Miss Carroll Hart, director of Georgia’s Department of Archives and History, who was unable to attend.

More than 125 guests attended a reception following the ceremonies.

Tuesday, April 29, 1969

Rare print show opens Thursday on Berry campus

A collection of 22 original Currier and Ives prints will be exhibited for two weeks in Memorial Library on the Berry College campus beginning Thursday.

George Jones, a Berry graduate and a representative of the Travelers Insurance Companies, which assembled the collections, stated that the display is one of a series of 13 collections of rare prints now being shown throughout the United States and Canada.

The colorful prints, selected from one of the most comprehensive collections in existence, portray America during the mid-19th century. They depict both rural and urban scenes as well as historical events of political or social importance.

The Travelers began to assemble this collection in 1935. Since then the company has reproduced more than 380 of these lithographs in its calendars.

100 years ago as presented in the April 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

A broken rail on the Southern Railway at the Lindale crossing near the depot was found by night watchman W.A. Mathis, Lindale Mills. And it was of such a nature that it was nothing but miraculous that the several trains, including the fast Royal Palm, that passed over it did not derail, resulting in a serious wreck. Section Foreman Upchurch was notified and was soon on the scene, allowing trains to pass over the broken place at an easy pace, until his crew could replace it with a new rail.

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Two members of the Tribune-Herald composing room force succumbed to Cupid and the balmy days of spring, so taking their brides before Ordinary Harry Johnson, and a double wedding was carried out in that popular functionary’s office.

Mr. James A. Griggs and Miss Martha Caldwell and Mr L.R. Barron and Miss Pauline Dilbeck were the principals in the double marriage ceremony and the ordinary’s office was soon radiating with happiness.

Mr. and Mrs. Barron and Mr. and Mrs. Griggs will reside in Rome.

Sunday, April 27, 1969

Gift for Penny

DENVER – Penny Powers, a night club singer who lost both legs in an automobile accident, received as a gift an electric guitar made by a prisoner at the Colorado Penitentiary. The prisoner, Harry Rupert, 43, serving a term for kidnapping a state patrolman, estimated he spent 700 hours making the instrument.

Wednesday, April 30, 1969

New driver training program on display tonight at Coosa

New driver education equipment – the only type of its kind in northern Georgia – will be on display Thursday at an open house for the Driver Education Department at Coosa High School.

Open house will begin at 7 p.m.

J.B. Angelo Crowe, superintendent of Driver Education for the State Education Department, and a representative of Governor Lester Maddox, will be present at the open house.

The most modern equipment for use in student driving instruction will be demonstrated.

The equipment consists of a teacher console with a small computer, a wide projection screen, and six electronic driver-simulator vehicles which allow students to experience driving situations while removed from the actual danger of the highway. The installation will enable Floyd County schools to offer a full driver education course to more than 200 15-year-old students each school year. The installation is housed in a mobile classroom containing 600 square feet and it allows the instructor to monitor each vehicle and to correct driving errors as they develop.

According to Tim Hawkins, assistant superintendent, the driving simulators reduce the behind-the-wheel time necessary for a student from six hours to three, thus allowing more students to be enrolled in driver training each year.

The driver education department was partially financed by funds from the National Highway Safety Act.

Driver education classes began three years ago at Coosa High School. At the beginning, there were only two classes with 20 students each, and consisted of 30 hours of class instruction and six hours of behind-the-wheel instruction.

At the end of the 1968 school year, the administration decided that a broader program was necessary in order to offer the program to all eligible students.

Money was finally obtained from the federal government and materials were furnished and according to Homer Mathis, driver training instructor, the new system will provide facilities for 200 students by giving them 30 hours of class instruction, 12 hours of simulator training and three hours of behind-the-wheel experience.

100 years ago as presented in the April 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

A broken rail on the Southern Railway at the Lindale crossing near the depot was found by night watchman W.A. Mathis, Lindale Mills. And it was of such a nature that it was nothing but miraculous that the several trains, including the fast Royal Palm, that passed over it did not derail, resulting in a serious wreck. Section Foreman Upchurch was notified and was soon on the scene, allowing trains to pass over the broken place at an easy pace, until his crew could replace it with a new rail.

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Two members of the Tribune-Herald composing room force succumbed to Cupid and the balmy days of spring, so taking their brides before Ordinary Harry Johnson, and a double wedding was carried out in that popular functionary’s office.

Mr. James A. Griggs and Miss Martha Caldwell and Mr L.R. Barron and Miss Pauline Dilbeck were the principals in the double marriage ceremony and the ordinary’s office was soon radiating with happiness.

Mr. and Mrs. Barron and Mr. and Mrs. Griggs will reside in Rome.

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The patriotic essays the children of the fourth grade in the city schools have written in a contest on “Why We Should Buy a Victory Bond,” will be read at the high school. A large audience will doubtless attend this interesting contest.

Two prizes will be given, one to the best essay by a girl, and the other for the best one by a boy, and the prize papers, will afterwards be published.

The judges for the contest are Misses S.M. Magruder and Mrs. Charles Pitney, and a great deal of suppressed excitement prevails among the youthful contestants, anticipating the outcome.

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The brewers of the New York district took action intended to speed the court determination of their claim that beer of 2-3/4 alcoholic content may be produced without violating the food conservation regulations, and two Brewers began the distribution of beer of that strength, bearing a label stating it was non-intoxicating. The internal revenue collector refused to roll tax stamps, so they have fixed tags saying that the money equivalent to the stamps was deposited in the bank to await the claims of the government.

In the absence of Revenue Commissioner Roper the officials of the U.S. Revenue Bureau at Washington refused to predict what action might be taken as the result of the two New York brewers who began the distribution of the 2-3/4 percent beer in New York.