Monday, July 28, 2019

Floyd population stops getting younger

NEW YORK – A change has been taking place in the Floyd County population. It has stopped getting younger.

Back in 1960, for every local resident was older than 28.4 years, there was one who was younger.

That was the median age locally, as determined by the 1960 census.

Also, it was found, the median age was moving downward, year by year, which meant that the population as a whole was getting younger.

It continued falling through 1967, when it reached its lowest point, 26.7 years, where it stands at the present time, according to the latest figures.

In the rest of the United States, by way of comparison, Census Bureau figures indicate a median age of 27.4 and, in the state of Georgia, 24.3.

The major reason given for the standstill in the median age is the low birth rate that prevails. There has been a drastic shift, locally and elsewhere, in the child-bearing patterns of the modern woman. The trend is toward smaller families.

The Population Reference Bureau attributes this, in part, “to a realization by younger married couples that rearing children in this complicated and expensive world presents big problems.”

Tuesday, July 29, 1969

Shanklin-Attaway Post 5, auxiliary install officers

American Legion Post 5 held a joint installation of new officers of the post and auxiliary at its meeting Monday night.

C.B. Burker, Senior Vice Commander of the Department of Georgia American Legion, installed the officers for Post 5. They are Dana Treglown, commander; Herman Adams, senior vice commander; Eugene Beard, Harold Caldwell, Jackson B. Harris, and Lonnie Van Horn, junior vice commanders; Jesse Hunter, finance officer; Francis Dunphy, adjutant; Reese Ballard, service officer; Milton L. Rogers, chaplain; Joe Scruggs and Harold Martin, sergeants-at-arms; and M.W. (Cap) Hicks, judge advocate.

The new executive committee installed by Burker includes Harold Hardin, Francis Dunphy, F.L. Dodd, Frank Goss, R.C. Morrison, Roger Aycock, Percy Garrett and Jack Martin.

Mrs. C. B. Burker, president of the 7th District Legion Auxiliary installed the new officers. They are Mrs. Bertie C. Ott, president; Mrs. F.L. Dodd, 1st vice president; Mrs. Francis Dunphy, secretary; Mrs. Joe Downs, treasurer; Mrs. Jessie Hunter, historian; Mrs. Mary Harless, chaplain; and Mrs. Jack Martin and Mrs. J.P. Mooney, sergeant-at-arms.

Outgoing Commander Frank Goss presented American flag shoulder patches for members of the sheriff’s department and city and county police. Goss made the presentation to Sheriff Joe Adams, Frank Perry, assistant chief of the Rome Police, and Alvin Fowler, assistant chief of the Floyd County Police. The patches will be worn by all members of each police force.

Wednesday, July 30, 1969

Another era ends

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (UPI) – An important part of the once-thriving railroad industry died here in June with the closing of the coffee shop in the last Fred Harvey railroad hotel.

The Fred Harvey chain presently operates at some 50 locations in nine states, but the Territorial Spanish style Alvarado Hotel adjacent to the Santa Fe Railroad in Albuquerque was the last of the so-called “railroad” hotels which once catered to rail passengers.

The Alvarado was opened in 1902, one of many hotels strung along the Santa Fe lines by Fred Harvey who emigrated to the United States from England in 1850. It was Harvey who first conceived the idea of providing rail passengers with first-class restaurants at depots instead of greasy lunch counters.

He worked at several jobs before the concept germinated. As western freight agent for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, he traveled extensively and found out the hard way just how bad food was at train stations.

He and a man named Jeff Rice opened three restaurants along the Kansas Pacific line but split up their successful business because of a difference on expansion plans. The Burlington rejected Harvey’s grandiose plan for a far-flung network of restaurants along the railroad lines, but the Santa Fe thought it was an intriguing proposition.

The first Harvey House opened in 1879 in Topeka, Kan. Offering excellent food on tables covered by white linen, served by young ladies in starched white shirtwaists, the restaurants were an instant success.

Through the 1890s Harvey House restaurants spread through Kansas, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona and California. The conductor would poll the passengers before coming to a station to find how many wanted counter service and how many planned to eat in the dining room, then telegraphed that information to the next Harvey House.

When the train was about a mile away from the depot, the engineer blew his whistle to warn the restaurant, and by the time the train pulled in food was piled high on the tables.

As train speed increased it became impractical to have long food stops at depots so Harvey provided food service on the train.

At one time the historic lunchroom served 1,000 hungry patrons a day. Now it is closed but the Alvarado remains open, a reminder of the glamorous past of the American railroad.

Thursday, July 31, 1969

Morrison’s homer, two-hit gem has Motor Contract rolling, 1-0

Bubba Morrison has a theory about baseball – if you want a job done to your satisfaction, then do it yourself.

And that’s exactly what Morrison did Wednesday night as Motor Contract defeated Kiwanis is a 1-0 cliffhanger to advance in the Citywide 9-12 baseball tournament.

All Morrison did was throw a two-hit shutout at Kiwanis and account for his team’s only run by belting a pitch out of the park for a home run.

Motor Contract was first at bat in its game with Kiwanis so Morrison put his bat to work before he did his arm. When he clouted a pitch for a four-bagger, it was all Motor Contract needed for the win.

Only Mike Barclay and Tommy Brownlow were able to get hits off Morrison and both of those were singles. The winners managed five hits, including a pair by David Allen.

This was just one of six games played last night. In other action, TPA nipped Rotary, 9-8’ Optimist outscored Lions, 11-6; Pepperell rolled over Legion, 14-8; D&J Manufacturing Co. whipped Cave Spring, 9-3 and Exchange edged RTD, 5-4.

Today’s lineup at Ransom Field pits TPA against Georgia Kraft at 5:15 p.m., Motor Contract against D&J at 7 p.m. and Pepperell against Exchange at 8:45 p.m.

100 years ago as presented in the July 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

After cruising back and forth across the Chicago Loop District for hours, a dirigible balloon carrying five persons exploded, the blazing wreckage crashing through the skylight of the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank in the center of the financial district. The police fixed the list of the dead as a result of the accident at 10 and more than a score injured. Thousands saw the accident. Three of the dead were passengers aboard the dirigible, and the others were employees of the bank.

***

After an exciting chase and a big high-powered auto in the wee small hours of the morning, Sheriff Wash Smith, with deputy sheriff W.B. Davis and police officers Henry Selman and Ernest Carlson, finally had to give up pursuit of another car in which were two occupants suspected of having a cargo of moonshine whiskey. The race began near Seney, in this county and after a two-hour run over the rugged hills of Floyd and Polk counties, the officers lost their quarry several miles from the city of Cedartown when the auto suspected of containing whiskey suddenly eluded the sheriff by turning off into a strange road and disappeared.

***

A number of Rome girls are being delightfully entertained as guests of Miss Ora Belle Updegrove camping party at Armuchee.

Tense for the accommodation of the guests are located near the lake where bathing and swimming are among the pleasures of camp life frequently indulged in.

Misses Patty B. Berry, Hallie King, Louise and Helen Kendall, Elizabeth Ledbetter, Minnette Weems, Josephine and Frances Graves are among the guests.

***

Whether the people of Rome are possessed with an abundance of indifference or that the police have succeeded in enforcing the traffic situation with marked efficiency was demonstrated here when Herschell, the 18-month-old child of Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Harris, of Gadsden, Ala., who are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Presley Esserman on Fifth Avenue, traversed the distance from Fifth Avenue to the Broad Street bridge without attracting the attention of passers-by.

The wee tot slipped away from the Esserman home unobserved and shortly afterward was missed by his parents. The search was begun that terminated an hour later when the baby was found, enjoying the sights on the Broad Street bridge, by Officer Wilson, and restored to the arms of his distracted mother.

Monday, July 28, 2019

 

Floyd population stops getting younger

 

NEW YORK – A change has been taking place in the Floyd County population. It has stopped getting younger.

Back in 1960, for every local resident was older than 28.4 years, there was one who was younger.

That was the median age locally, as determined by the 1960 census.

Also, it was found, the median age was moving downward, year by year, which meant that the population as a whole was getting younger.

It continued falling through 1967, when it reached its lowest point, 26.7 years, where it stands at the present time, according to the latest figures.

In the rest of the United States, by way of comparison, Census Bureau figures indicate a median age of 27.4 and, in the state of Georgia, 24.3.

The major reason given for the standstill in the median age is the low birth rate that prevails. There has been a drastic shift, locally and elsewhere, in the child-bearing patterns of the modern woman. The trend is toward smaller families.

The Population Reference Bureau attributes this, in part, “to a realization by younger married couples that rearing children in this complicated and expensive world presents big problems.”

 

 

Tuesday, July 29, 1969

 

Shanklin-Attaway Post 5, auxiliary install officers

 

American Legion Post 5 held a joint installation of new officers of the post and auxiliary at its meeting Monday night.

C.B. Burker, Senior Vice Commander of the Department of Georgia American Legion, installed the officers for Post 5. They are Dana Treglown, commander; Herman Adams, senior vice commander; Eugene Beard, Harold Caldwell, Jackson B. Harris, and Lonnie Van Horn, junior vice commanders; Jesse Hunter, finance officer; Francis Dunphy, adjutant; Reese Ballard, service officer; Milton L. Rogers, chaplain; Joe Scruggs and Harold Martin, sergeants-at-arms; and M.W. (Cap) Hicks, judge advocate.

The new executive committee installed by Burker includes Harold Hardin, Francis Dunphy, F.L. Dodd, Frank Goss, R.C. Morrison, Roger Aycock, Percy Garrett and Jack Martin.

Mrs. C. B. Burker, president of the 7th District Legion Auxiliary installed the new officers. They are Mrs. Bertie C. Ott, president; Mrs. F.L. Dodd, 1st vice president; Mrs. Francis Dunphy, secretary; Mrs. Joe Downs, treasurer; Mrs. Jessie Hunter, historian; Mrs. Mary Harless, chaplain; and Mrs. Jack Martin and Mrs. J.P. Mooney, sergeant-at-arms.

Outgoing Commander Frank Goss presented American flag shoulder patches for members of the sheriff’s department and city and county police. Goss made the presentation to Sheriff Joe Adams, Frank Perry, assistant chief of the Rome Police, and Alvin Fowler, assistant chief of the Floyd County Police. The patches will be worn by all members of each police force.

 

 

Wednesday, July 30, 1969

 

Another era ends

 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (UPI) – An important part of the once-thriving railroad industry died here in June with the closing of the coffee shop in the last Fred Harvey railroad hotel.

The Fred Harvey chain presently operates at some 50 locations in nine states, but the Territorial Spanish style Alvarado Hotel adjacent to the Santa Fe Railroad in Albuquerque was the last of the so-called “railroad” hotels which once catered to rail passengers.

The Alvarado was opened in 1902, one of many hotels strung along the Santa Fe lines by Fred Harvey who emigrated to the United States from England in 1850. It was Harvey who first conceived the idea of providing rail passengers with first-class restaurants at depots instead of greasy lunch counters.

He worked at several jobs before the concept germinated. As western freight agent for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, he traveled extensively and found out the hard way just how bad food was at train stations.

He and a man named Jeff Rice opened three restaurants along the Kansas Pacific line but split up their successful business because of a difference on expansion plans. The Burlington rejected Harvey’s grandiose plan for a far-flung network of restaurants along the railroad lines, but the Santa Fe thought it was an intriguing proposition.

The first Harvey House opened in 1879 in Topeka, Kan. Offering excellent food on tables covered by white linen, served by young ladies in starched white shirtwaists, the restaurants were an instant success.

Through the 1890s Harvey House restaurants spread through Kansas, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona and California. The conductor would poll the passengers before coming to a station to find how many wanted counter service and how many planned to eat in the dining room, then telegraphed that information to the next Harvey House.

When the train was about a mile away from the depot, the engineer blew his whistle to warn the restaurant, and by the time the train pulled in food was piled high on the tables.

As train speed increased it became impractical to have long food stops at depots so Harvey provided food service on the train.

At one time the historic lunchroom served 1,000 hungry patrons a day. Now it is closed but the Alvarado remains open, a reminder of the glamorous past of the American railroad.

 

 

Thursday, July 31, 1969

 

Morrison’s homer, two-hit gem has Motor Contract rolling, 1-0

 

Bubba Morrison has a theory about baseball – if you want a job done to your satisfaction, then do it yourself.

And that’s exactly what Morrison did Wednesday night as Motor Contract defeated Kiwanis is a 1-0 cliffhanger to advance in the Citywide 9-12 baseball tournament.

All Morrison did was throw a two-hit shutout at Kiwanis and account for his team’s only run by belting a pitch out of the park for a home run.

Motor Contract was first at bat in its game with Kiwanis so Morrison put his bat to work before he did his arm. When he clouted a pitch for a four-bagger, it was all Motor Contract needed for the win.

Only Mike Barclay and Tommy Brownlow were able to get hits off Morrison and both of those were singles. The winners managed five hits, including a pair by David Allen.

This was just one of six games played last night. In other action, TPA nipped Rotary, 9-8’ Optimist outscored Lions, 11-6; Pepperell rolled over Legion, 14-8; D&J Manufacturing Co. whipped Cave Spring, 9-3 and Exchange edged RTD, 5-4.

Today’s lineup at Ransom Field pits TPA against Georgia Kraft at 5:15 p.m., Motor Contract against D&J at 7 p.m. and Pepperell against Exchange at 8:45 p.m.

 

 

100 years ago as presented in the July 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

 

After cruising back and forth across the Chicago Loop District for hours, a dirigible balloon carrying five persons exploded, the blazing wreckage crashing through the skylight of the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank in the center of the financial district. The police fixed the list of the dead as a result of the accident at 10 and more than a score injured. Thousands saw the accident. Three of the dead were passengers aboard the dirigible, and the others were employees of the bank.

***

After an exciting chase and a big high-powered auto in the wee small hours of the morning, Sheriff Wash Smith, with deputy sheriff W.B. Davis and police officers Henry Selman and Ernest Carlson, finally had to give up pursuit of another car in which were two occupants suspected of having a cargo of moonshine whiskey. The race began near Seney, in this county and after a two-hour run over the rugged hills of Floyd and Polk counties, the officers lost their quarry several miles from the city of Cedartown when the auto suspected of containing whiskey suddenly eluded the sheriff by turning off into a strange road and disappeared.

***

A number of Rome girls are being delightfully entertained as guests of Miss Ora Belle Updegrove camping party at Armuchee. 

Tense for the accommodation of the guests are located near the lake where bathing and swimming are among the pleasures of camp life frequently indulged in.

Misses Patty B. Berry, Hallie King, Louise and Helen Kendall, Elizabeth Ledbetter, Minnette Weems, Josephine and Frances Graves are among the guests.

***

Whether the people of Rome are possessed with an abundance of indifference or that the police have succeeded in enforcing the traffic situation with marked efficiency was demonstrated here when Herschell, the 18-month-old child of Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Harris, of Gadsden, Ala., who are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Presley Esserman on Fifth Avenue, traversed the distance from Fifth Avenue to the Broad Street bridge without attracting the attention of passers-by.

The wee tot slipped away from the Esserman home unobserved and shortly afterward was missed by his parents. The search was begun that terminated an hour later when the baby was found, enjoying the sights on the Broad Street bridge, by Officer Wilson, and restored to the arms of his distracted mother.