Sunday, Dec. 14, 1969

‘Rights Day’ is proclaimed in Rome Monday

The Rome Town Committee of the Colonial Dames of America will sponsor the observance of the “Bill of Rights Day” on Monday which marks the 178th anniversary of the adoption of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution.

In recognition of the day, Ben Lucas, chairman of the Rome City Commission, has issued a proclamation proclaiming Monday as “Bill of Rights Day” in Rome, urging all citizens “to pay special attention to our Bill of Rights as representing the first 10 amendments to the Constitution preserving our rights as citizens of the United States of America.”

The scope and application of the words of the U.S. Constitution have changed with the years but the document has been amended only 13 times. There are 25 amendments but the first 10, the Bill of Rights, were submitted and passed at the same time.

The amendments outline freedom of religion, speech, of the press, and right of petition; rights of the people to bear arms; quartering of troops; the right of people and houses to be secure from unreasonable searches and seizure; civil and criminal trials; civil rights in civil suits, prohibits excessive bail, fines and punishment; quartered individual rights and states’ rights.

100 years ago as presented in the December 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

Rome looked like herself with the White Way lights again all aglow and the electric signs again blinking their eyes to the public, with a glare of light from every store along the street.

The order of the Fuel Administration in Atlanta putting Rome back on the list of lighted cities, because of the fact that it secures its electric power from hydroelectric sources, was the cause.

One never misses the sunshine until the rain, and even so it was with the light. Rome folks missed it when it was taken away and they let that missing be known. Rome folks who had lived for a year or so in the dark cities of France felt kind of like they were at home again, but when the night came with its lights the old city looked like itself again and a general better feeling manifested all around.

The heat regulations are still in force.

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Miss Medora Field leaves for Atlanta, where she will be with the staff of the Atlanta Journal, doing special feature work for the Sunday magazine. Miss Field is one of Georgia’s gifted writers, whose work has been much enjoyed by readers of the Tribune-Herald. In addition to her newspaper work she has been a contributor to a number of magazines, including the Woman’s Home Companion, the December issue of which carries one of her stories. Miss Fields’ many Rome friends predict great success for her.

Monday, Dec. 15, 1969

Roman named Berry College top graduate

Mrs. Pamela W. Brumbelow, of 3 Glenwood Apartments, received the highest academic honors at winter graduation ceremonies Sunday at Berry College.

Mrs. Brumbelow graduated magna cum laude. A mathematics major, she was awarded her bachelor of arts degree among 94 other graduates.

Ten Rome area students graduated magna cum laude: Regina Bishop, 405 Edgewood Ave.; Sharon Blankenship, 110 South Blanche Ave.; Sara Burdette, 13 Westland Dr.; Barbara Early, Rte. 3, Rome; Virginia Howard, Rte. 1, Rome; Audrey Key, Mount Berry; June Lewis, Mount Berry; Beverly Sherman, 9 Cypress Street, Rebecca Taglioli, 313 Woodbine Ave.; and Marshall Williams, 4 Sycamore St.

Two other students received their degrees cum laude: Sara Hutchins, Summerville, and Wyatt Truelove, Murrayville.

The commencement address was given by William R. Bowdoin, vice chairman of the board of the Trust Company of Georgia, Atlanta, and vice chairman of the Berry College Board of Trustees. Dr. John R. Bertrand, president of Berry College, conferred the degrees.

Thursday, Dec. 18, 1969

Coosa ace Gary Graves signs grant with Dogs

Coosa quarterback Gary Graves, who had a big hand in the Eagles’ march to the Georgia Class-A football championship, signed a grant-in-aid Wednesday afternoon with the University of Georgia.

Doc Ayers, administrative assistant to head coach Vince Dooley, was in Rome to sign Graves and hailed him as a “tremendous prospect who only now is beginning to reach his real potential.”

It was the second Floyd County player signed by Georgia and the third signed by the Southeastern Conference school system since the recruiting war started at high noon this past Saturday.

Ayers signed Bill Smith, a lineman from Darlington, and the University of Alabama picked off West Rome linebacker David Watkins. Head coach Paul Bear Bryant flew into Rome early Sunday to get Watkins name on the dotted line.

The signing of Graves came as no great surprise. Ayers scouted Coosa repeatedly during the playoffs and got a bird’s-eye view of Graves’ playing ability. It was his passing and running that kept the Eagles offense on the move during the three-game playoff series.

In the championship game against Fitzgerald this past weekend, Graves scored two touchdowns on short runs and accounted for almost 100 net yards rushing. He also passed for a two-point conversion that padded the Eagles’ lead in the early minutes of the fourth period.

“We consider Graves an outstanding prospect with great potential,” Ayers said. “Also, we think he’s capable of playing more than one position which always is a good indication of a boy’s ability.”

Graves was Coosa’s regular quarterback during the past two seasons and during that span the Eagles compiled a record of 21 victories and just three losses. This past season, Coosa was 12 and 1.

For the regular season, he carried the ball 97 times and gained 706 net yards. He also hit on 29 of 64 passes for another 679 yards and seven touchdowns. Graves scored 44 points and punted for an average of 35 yards per game.

He added over 200 more yards to that total during the playoffs finishing the season with a total offense of some 2,000 yards.

Ayers delayed his trip to El Paso, Texas, where the Bulldogs are competing in the Sun Bowl, to sign Graves to a grant.

Other area boys are expected to sign grants in coming weeks.

100 years ago as presented in the December 1919 editions of the Rome Tribune-Herald

Miss Medora Field leaves for Atlanta, where she will be with the staff of the Atlanta Journal, doing special feature work for the Sunday magazine. Miss Field is one of Georgia’s gifted writers, whose work has been much enjoyed by readers of the Tribune-Herald. In addition to her newspaper work she has been a contributor to a number of magazines, including the Woman’s Home Companion, the December issue of which carries one of her stories. Miss Fields’ many Rome friends predict great success for her.

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Many theories have been advanced for the scarcity and high price of sugar, but the United States Equalization Board places the blame on the American sweet tooth. In a notice issued recently, it is pointed out that more sugar was used in the first three months of 1919 than during the entire previous year, and that total domestic consumption for the 12 months will be one quarter of the entire world’s sugar production.

The statement says that there is a world shortage of two million tons, and in spite of this, the United States is getting one half of the world’s exportable surplus.

America’s per capita consumption for 1919 up until September reached 70 pounds, as against 73 for the whole year of 1918 and 83 for 1917.

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As an extra precaution First Chief Albert Sharpe, of the fire department, will install his nightly fire center tours and conduct a daily inspection of the commercial district during the day to keep down fire risks.

The inspections will be for piles of trash, paper, blocked fire plugs, etc, while the fire center tours will be made from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Two men will walk the tours which will be for six hours each. The first two will be going on at 6 p.m. and coming off at 12 midnight, the other two going on at that time and staying on until 6 a.m.

The fire precautions will be kept in force throughout the holiday season until Jan. 2.

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