UPDATED: Haney remembered for guidance, strong leadership at River City Bank - Northwest Georgia News: National

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UPDATED: Haney remembered for guidance, strong leadership at River City Bank

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Posted: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 1:30 am | Updated: 1:34 am, Tue Jul 15, 2014.

Richard W. Haney Sr. always wore a smile.

A member of River City Bank’s board of directors, the 70-year-old Haney was known for his leadership, guidance and love of family.

“Richard Haney was a very good person,” said Roger Smith, the bank’s president and CEO. “He was a supportive director. His leadership has played a vital role here at the bank.”

Haney and his grandson, 9-year-old Jeffery, died in a Sunday plane crash near Carrollton. The National Transportation Safety Board on Monday released the names of the deceased. An investigation into the crash is ongoing.

“We really are very, deeply saddened,” Smith said.

Haney, of Carrollton, moved to that city almost 50 years ago. He served as an assistant professor of business management at the University of West Georgia.

Haney was president and CEO of Richard Haney Ford in Carrollton from 1977 until his retirement in 2010. He also served as partner, president and general manager of Air Services of West Georgia.

Haney is credited with the development of Oak Mountain Golf Club and its surrounding area. He also worked with The Salvation Army and the Carrollton Rotary Club, Smith said.

Haney joined River City Bank’s board of directors in August 2009, and recently served on the bank’s credit committee and trust committee.

“I can’t express how grateful we are to him and his service here,” Smith said.

Federal investigators said at a Monday press conference that they’ll examine several components of Haney’s plane.

The small, amateur-built plane was found Sunday evening in woods near Carrollton. The wreckage spanned an area about 100 feet long and 50 feet wide, said Ralph Hicks, National Transportation Safety Board investigator.

According to Hicks, the plane hit a tree. Its engine and propeller came off after impact.

The plane had no black box or recording equipment.

The crash investigation into the plane’s engine and flight controls will continue today, Hicks said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

PREVIOUSLY POSTED: Atlanta news outlets are reporting that the two victims of a fatal plane crash in a wooded area near Carrollton have been identified.

Richard Haney, 70, and his grandson, 9-year-old Jeffery Haney, were killed with their small plane crashed Sunday.

Haney, of Carrollton, had been on the Rome-based River City Bank board of directors since 2009, according to the bank's website. He was also president of the Haney Family Partnership and president and CEO of Aviation Pursuits, Inc.

Federal investigators say they're planning to probe several components of the plane.

National Transportation Safety Board investigator Ralph Hicks said during a press conference that the wreckage of the small, amateur-built plane found in a wooded area near Carrolton Sunday evening spanned an area that was about 100 feet long and 50 feet wide.

Hicks says the investigation will continue Tuesday with a review of the plane's engine and flight controls.

Hicks says the plane first hit a tree and the engine and propeller came off after impact. Carroll County Coroner Samuel Eady says authorities are using dental records to identify the two passengers.

Hicks says the small plane wasn't equipped with a black box or any other recording mechanism.

Previously Posted:

ATLANTA (AP) — An emergency management official says two people have died in the crash of an amateur-built experimental biplane in west Georgia.

Carroll County Emergency Management Director Tim Padgett told The Associated Press early Monday that two people were found dead at the scene of the crash, in a wooded area near Carrollton, Georgia. Officials haven't released further details on the deaths.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said late Sunday that preliminary information indicated that two people were on board the aircraft, which was destroyed by fire. She said authorities had not yet confirmed where the airplane had departed before it crashed.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board were expected to be at the scene Monday.